What You Should Know About Stevia for Keto Dieting

Sugar is the enemy of the keto diet. While trying to maintain a state of ketosis, you need to keep your carb count incredibly low. In fact, most keto dieters consume 30 grams or less of net carbs per day.

Cutting out the sugar isn’t always easy.

Luckily, you can substitute it with sweeteners. Stevia is a sweetener that a lot of people confuse with Splenda. While both products are designed to provide a low-carb alternative to sugar, they are completely different.

Splenda is an artificial sweetener made from real sugar and Stevia is a natural sweetener made from a plant extract.

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If you need to sweeten your foods or drinks while on the keto diet, Stevia may offer the solution.

The Basics: How Is Stevia Made?

Stevia is a natural product. It comes from a plant that is native to Brazil and Paraguay. The leaves are dried and crushed to create a powder that can be used as a natural sweetener.

While Stevia is now a popular sweetener that can be found online and in health food stores, it has been used for hundreds of years to sweeten foods and drinks. People would also chew on the leaves as a simple, sweet treat.

The leaves from the stevia bush were also used for medicinal purposes. People would crush the leaves to create healing ointments for burns or medicines for digestive issues.

When sold as a natural sweetener, Stevia is 200 times sweeter than sugar. It may even help with hypertension and obesity. However, more studies are needed to explore the potential health benefits.

Is Stevia Sweetener Keto-Friendly?

Can you use Stevia on the ketogenic diet? Stevia is keto friendly when used in moderation.
Most people use about two teaspoons of Stevia when sweetening their drinks. These two teaspoons contain just under one gram of carbohydrates.

While Stevia should not derail your keto meal plan, you should use caution. It’s easy to lose track of just how much Stevia you use.

If you use it several times throughout the day, you may start adding unnecessary carbs to your diet. Consuming too much of any sugar, including the sugar found in natural sweeteners, may increase your risk of health problems, promote tooth decay, and ruin your keto diet.

Stevia can provide a healthy substitute for sugar if you use it sparingly. It’s a natural product that may not contain any major side effects or a lot of carbs or calories.

It’s best used as an occasional treat when you need to satisfy your sweet tooth. It also provides a healthier option compared to most artificial sweeteners.

Potential Drawbacks to Using Stevia for Keto Dieting

Stevia is FDA-approved for food consumption and has been thoroughly tested for potentially negative health effects. However, some people claim that Stevia upsets their stomachs.

There are anecdotal reports of gastrointestinal distress such as bloating and gas. These issues aren’t widely reported. Luckily, you can avoid them by not using too much Stevia.

The only real issue that you should worry about is giving in to your cravings. If you use a sweetener to curb sugar cravings, you may never get over your cravings.

It’s completely normal to crave sugary foods and drinks when you cut sugar out of your diet. Most people tend to get over these cravings within a few weeks. It’s the transition period that is often difficult for new keto dieters to get through.

If you decide to use a sweetener to keep yourself from reaching for a bag of potato chips or cookies, avoid using the sweetener frequently. You need to wean yourself off the sugar and Stevia may keep this from happening.

Alternatives to Stevia for the Ketogenic Diet

Along with Stevia, there are a few other products that you can use as sugar substitutes. Monk fruit, Splenda, and various artificial sweeteners contain some of the sweetness of sugar without the carbs and calories.

Monk fruit and Stevia are the two most popular natural sweeteners. They are natural because they are made with natural ingredients.

Both sweeteners are extracted from plants. However, monk fruit may contain more antioxidants, which may provide a few added health benefits. The antioxidants found in monk fruit may fight inflammation, bacteria, and infections.

If monk fruit contains more health benefits, why do people still use Stevia? Stevia is typically much cheaper compared to monk fruit.

Besides Stevia and monk fruit, there is also Erythritol that may already have in your kitchen.

There are also a few artificial sweeteners. Splenda and other sucralose-based sweeteners contain the same calories and carbs as Stevia and monk fruit, which means that you can safely use them while on the ketogenic diet. However, they may contain their own potential for gastrointestinal discomfort.

Stevia is a natural sweetener that is 200 times sweeter than sugar. You can safely use it without throwing your ketogenic diet meal plan out of whack.

Conclusion: Should You Use Stevia on the Keto Diet?

The ketogenic diet requires you to keep track of everything that you eat and drink. You need to watch your macronutrient intake, especially the carbs closely.

If you include too many carbs, you’re merely following a low-carb diet instead of the keto diet. One of the worst sources of carbs is regular table sugar. Sugar essentially contains empty calories and carbs and contributes to weight gain.

Stevia offers an alternative to sugar. It is a natural sweetener that is several hundred times sweeter than sugar. It also contains almost no carbs or calories. You can safely add it to your food and drinks without throwing your ketogenic diet meal plan out of whack.

The only issue that you may need to worry about is the amount of the sweetener that you use. It should only be used in moderation.

A sweetener is not a magic solution for keeping sugar in your life. It’s a healthy substitute for an occasional treat.

Nutritional and medical disclaimer
Please note that I am not a nutritional or medical professional. I do not give out any medical advice. I only share my own experience on this blog and encourage you to consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. The nutritional information provided for my recipes are estimates. Please calculate nutritional information on your own before relying on them. None of the recipes I post are meant to be used by any specific clinical population. The ingredients in my recipes do not affect my glucose levels or cause any allergic reactions to me. You should use my recipes and shared experience at your discretion. I expressly disclaim any and all liability of any kind with respect to any act or omission wholly or in part in reliance on anything contained on this website.

2 Comments

  1. Quanties of the ingredients for making deserts r absent.

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